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World War I and America Film: All Quiet on the Western Front

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Veterans Room

Film historian Doug Deuchler screens and discusses films in a six-week series, part of the library's World War I and America program this October and November. Today, see All Quiet on the Western Front, based on the 1928 book by Erich Maria Remarque. Here, in the first major anti-war film made in 1930, a young soldier faces profound disillusionment in the soul-destroying horror of World War I. 133 minutes.

All films in the series are on Wednesdays, 1:30–4:30 pm, in the Main Library Veterans Room.

  • Oct. 4: All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)
  • Oct. 11: Sergeant York (1941)
  • Oct. 18: Wings (1927)
  • Oct. 25: The Dawn Patrol (1938)
  • Nov. 1: Paths of Glory (1957)
  • Nov. 8: Joyeux Noel (Merry Christmas) (2005)

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

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World War I and America: Essay Discussion, Part 1

1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Small Meeting Room

Join former Marine Corps officer Ed White, who served in Vietnam in 1968-69, to read and discuss a series of essays drawn from World War I and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It. Pick up packets of essays at any Oak Park Public Library location. U.S. veterans as well as interested readers are encouraged to attend.

This is the first in a series of three discussions, with readings from: 

  • Friday, October 6: From a letter by Alan Seeger to Elsie Simmons Seeger.
  • Friday, October 20: From the diary of Vernon E. Kniptash, written between March and April 1919.
  • Friday, November 3: From Henry Cabot Lodge and his speech on the Senate floor about the League of Nations on August 12, 1919.

Published to mark the centenary of the American entry into the conflict, World War I and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It brings together 128 diverse texts—speeches, messages, letters, diaries, poems, songs, newspaper and magazine articles, excerpts from memoirs and journalistic narratives—written by scores of American participants and observers that illuminate and vivify events from the outbreak of war in 1914 through the Armistice, the Paris Peace Conference, and the League of Nations debate. The writers collected in the volume—soldiers, airmen, nurses, diplomats, statesmen, political activists, journalists—provide unique insight into how Americans perceived the war and how the conflict transformed American life. It is being published by Library of America.

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

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Johnnies, Tommies, and Sammies: Music and the World War I Alliance

2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Veterans Room

Explore the contributions of popular songs from the U.S., Canada, and Britain to the Allies of World War I. This program, presented by musicologists and musical performers, includes slides, films, period recordings, and live performances of sheet music. Six university faculty from Chicago, Urbana-Champaign, Bloomington, and University of York, England, created this program in association with the American Musicological Society and the Library of Congress exhibition World War I: American Artists View the Great War.

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

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World War I: William Hazelgrove: Madam President: The Secret Presidency of Edith Wilson

7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Veterans Room

William Hazelgrove shares how his book, "Madam President:  The Secret Presidency of Edith Wilson,"portrays how Edith  Wilson became the acting president of the U. S. after her husband Woodrow Wilson suffered a stroke, months before women officially won the right to vote.

Woodrow Wilson was in the fight of his life to get the Treaty of Versailles ratified by the American Senate. The League of Nations was part of the treaty and cost Wilson his health when a massive stroke put his second wife, Edith Wilson in charge of the White House. Acting as President, she took on the fight to get the treaty ratified that would end World War I.  It would never happen. 


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World War I and America Film: Sergeant York

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Veterans Room

Film historian Doug Deuchler screens and discusses films in a six-week series, part of the library's World War I and America program this October and November. Today, see Sergeant York, a 1941 film in which Gary Cooper, a southern sharpshooter, is drafted into World War I, despite his claims of being a pacifist, and ends up becoming a war hero. 134 minutes.

All films in the series are on Wednesdays, 1:30–4:30 pm, in the Main Library Veterans Room.

  • Oct. 4: All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)
  • Oct. 11: Sergeant York (1941)
  • Oct. 18: Wings (1927)
  • Oct. 25: The Dawn Patrol (1938)
  • Nov. 1: Paths of Glory (1957)
  • Nov. 8: Joyeux Noel (Merry Christmas) (2005)

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

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Book Buzz: World War I and America for Kids: Pickle Preservation

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Main Library
First Floor - Storytime Room
With Cheryl Munoz from Sugar Beet Schoolhouse, learn about the history and propaganda around food during the war, and learn how to make your own World War I-style pickles. Best for ages 4+.

Food growing and preservation was considered a patriotic act during the First World War, as the U.S. government shipped a lot of food to Europe for soldiers. Young people were enlisted to grow food in their school gardens, and homeowners were encouraged to grow their own Victory Gardens. There were also special trainings to encourage people to preserve their harvest, and canning manuals and classes were offered by U.S. Department of Agriculture extension offices. 

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.
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World War I and America Book Discussion: All Quiet on the Western Front

1:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Maze Branch
Meeting Room - Maze Branch

A book discussion of All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque will be led by Donna Ioppolo. This 1928 book sold 3.5 million copies in the German original and additional 25 translations. Multiple copies of the book will be available in advance at Maze Branch Library.

"I am young, I am twenty years old; yet I know nothing of life but despair, death, fear, and fatuous superficiality cast over an abyss of sorrow..." This is the testament of Paul Baumer, who enlists with his classmates in the German Army of World War I. They become soldiers with youthful enthusiasm. But the world of duty, culture, and progress they had been taught breaks into pieces under the first bombardment in the trenches.

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

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Author Joe Gustaitis: Chicago Transformed: World War I & the Windy City

4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Veterans Room

Learn how World War I changed Chicago and how the city helped shape the history of World War I when author Joseph Gustaitis shares photos and stories from his book, Chicago Transformed: World War I and the Windy City

Between 1913 and 1919, Chicago transitioned from a 19th-century city to the metropolis it is today. Despite the importance of the war years, this period has not been documented adequately in histories of the city. In Chicago Transformed, Gustaitis fills this gap in the historical record, covering the important wartime events, developments, movements, and people that helped shape Chicago.

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

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World War I and America Book Discussion: The Summer Before the War

7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Dole Branch
Meeting Room - Dole Branch

It's the summer of 1914, and life in the sleepy village of Rye, England, is about to take an interesting turn as the shadow of the Great War looms ever closer to home. Enjoy a discussion of best-selling author Helen Simonson's historical novel, The Summer Before the War, led by Linda Ivy Miller. This book is full of the same wit, romance, and insight into the manners and morals of small-town British life as the author's beloved Major Pettigrew's Last Stand.

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

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Words on Wednesday: A Farewell to Arms

1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Book Discussion Room

Refresh your knowledge of the classic title A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway, a first-person account of American Frederic Henry, serving as a lieutenant in the ambulance corps of the Italian Army during World War I.

In Words on Wednesday, expect stimulating conversation about fiction and nonfiction titles selected by Adult & Teen Services librarians. Copies are available at the Main Library one month before the discussion. Learn more about our monthly book discussions

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

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World War I and America Film: Wings

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Veterans Room

Film historian Doug Deuchler screens and discusses films in a six-week series, part of the library's World War I and America program this October and November. Today, see Wings, a 1927 silent film with music that won the first Academy Award for Best Picture, in which two men from different social classes fall in love with the same woman and become fighter pilots in World War I. 144 minutes.

All films in the series are on Wednesdays, 1:30–4:30 pm, in the Main Library Veterans Room.

  • Oct. 4: All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)
  • Oct. 11: Sergeant York (1941)
  • Oct. 18: Wings (1927)
  • Oct. 25: The Dawn Patrol (1938)
  • Nov. 1: Paths of Glory (1957)
  • Nov. 8: Joyeux Noel (Merry Christmas) (2005)

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

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World War I and America: Essay Discussion, Part 2

1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Book Discussion Room

Join former Marine Corps officer Ed White, who served in Vietnam in 1968-69, to read and discuss a series of essays drawn from World War I and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It. Pick up packets of essays at any Oak Park Public Library location. U.S. veterans as well as interested readers are encouraged to attend.

This is the first in a series of three discussions, with readings from: 

  • Friday, October 6: From a letter by Alan Seeger to Elsie Simmons Seeger.
  • Friday, October 20: From the diary of Vernon E. Kniptash, written between March and April 1919.
  • Friday, November 3: From Henry Cabot Lodge and his speech on the Senate floor about the League of Nations on August 12, 1919.

Published to mark the centenary of the American entry into the conflict, World War I and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It brings together 128 diverse texts—speeches, messages, letters, diaries, poems, songs, newspaper and magazine articles, excerpts from memoirs and journalistic narratives—written by scores of American participants and observers that illuminate and vivify events from the outbreak of war in 1914 through the Armistice, the Paris Peace Conference, and the League of Nations debate. The writers collected in the volume—soldiers, airmen, nurses, diplomats, statesmen, political activists, journalists—provide unique insight into how Americans perceived the war and how the conflict transformed American life. It is being published by Library of America.

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

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Robert Mueller: American Doughboys and World War I

7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Offsite
Oak Park River Forest History Museum

In his multimedia presentation “American Doughboys in the First World War,” Robert Mueller reviews America's participation in "the war to end all wars." This historian and author takes listeners on a trip across the battlefields of northern France to describe the events, people, and places of America's contribution to the defeat of the German kaiser. Famous engagements such as Belleau Wood, Cantigny, St-Mihiel, and Meuse-Argonne are reviewed with images of what the battlefields look like today. Mueller concludes with the enormous changes that the conflict brought to warfare, society, and populations around the world.

Offsite location: Oak Park River Forest History Museum, 129 Lake St., Oak Park, IL.

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

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World War I and America Film: The Dawn Patrol

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Veterans Room

Film historian Doug Deuchler screens and discusses films in a six-week series, part of the library's World War I and America program this October and November. Today, see The Dawn Patrol, a 1938 silent film starring Errol Flynn and David Niven as British flying aces who must contend with the harsh realities of war.  103 minutes.

All films in the series are on Wednesdays, 1:30–4:30 pm, in the Main Library Veterans Room.

  • Oct. 4: All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)
  • Oct. 11: Sergeant York (1941)
  • Oct. 18: Wings (1927)
  • Oct. 25: The Dawn Patrol (1938)
  • Nov. 1: Paths of Glory (1957)
  • Nov. 8: Joyeux Noel (Merry Christmas) (2005)

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

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Registration is open

World War I and America: Kid Inventors

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Main Library
First Floor - Storytime Room

World War I sparked the creation of an abundance of surprising inventions. With our electronic building blocks littleBits, unleash your innovative spirit and make your own unique inventions that you can enjoy in the here and now. Best for children in grades 2-4. Register now. 

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

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Author Kathryn Atwood: Women Heroes of World War I

2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Veterans Room

Local author Kathryn Atwood will share stories of incredibly brave women  in her book, Women Heroes of World War I: 16 Remarkable Resisters, Soldiers, Spies, and Medics. A commemoration of brave, yet largely forgotten women who served in the First World War, this book brings to life the often surprising exploits of 16 fascinating women from around the world who served their countries at a time when most of them didn’t even have the right to vote. These suspense-filled stories are told through the use of engaging narrative, dialogue, direct quotes, as well as documents and diary excerpts to lend authenticity and immediacy.

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

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World War I: Dr. Paul Herbert: Great Soldiers of the First Division, 1917-1919

7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Veterans Room
To put a human face on the soldiers of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF), Dr. Paul Herbert, Executive Director of the First Division Museum at Cantigny, will share stories of some of the famous or interesting men and women who served with the First Division during World War I. The First Division was a special community that included famous names such as Theodore Roosevelt, Jr., and George C. Marshall; tough commanding generals like Robert L. Bullard and Charles R. Summerall; brave soldiers like Lt. Si Parker, who received the Medal of Honor; and characters such as Alban Butler, who, when not fighting, spent the war drawing cartoons.
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World War I and America Film: Paths of Glory

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Veterans Room

Film historian Doug Deuchler screens and discusses films in a six-week series, part of the library's World War I and America program this October and November. Today, see Paths of Glory, an anti-war film in which fiery French colonel Kirk Douglass goes head-to-head with the army's top brass when his men are accused of cowardice. 88 minutes.

All films in the series are on Wednesdays, 1:30–4:30 pm, in the Main Library Veterans Room.

  • Oct. 4: All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)
  • Oct. 11: Sergeant York (1941)
  • Oct. 18: Wings (1927)
  • Oct. 25: The Dawn Patrol (1938)
  • Nov. 1: Paths of Glory (1957)
  • Nov. 8: Joyeux Noel (Merry Christmas) (2005)

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

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World War I and America: Essay Discussion, Part 3

1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Small Meeting Room

Join former Marine Corps officer Ed White, who served in Vietnam in 1968-69, to read and discuss a series of essays drawn from World War I and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It. Pick up packets of essays at any Oak Park Public Library location. U.S. veterans as well as interested readers are encouraged to attend.

This is the first in a series of three discussions, with readings from: 

  • Friday, October 6: From a letter by Alan Seeger to Elsie Simmons Seeger.
  • Friday, October 20: From the diary of Vernon E. Kniptash, written between March and April 1919.
  • Friday, November 3: From Henry Cabot Lodge and his speech on the Senate floor about the League of Nations on August 12, 1919.

Published to mark the centenary of the American entry into the conflict, World War I and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It brings together 128 diverse texts—speeches, messages, letters, diaries, poems, songs, newspaper and magazine articles, excerpts from memoirs and journalistic narratives—written by scores of American participants and observers that illuminate and vivify events from the outbreak of war in 1914 through the Armistice, the Paris Peace Conference, and the League of Nations debate. The writers collected in the volume—soldiers, airmen, nurses, diplomats, statesmen, political activists, journalists—provide unique insight into how Americans perceived the war and how the conflict transformed American life. It is being published by Library of America.

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

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World War I and America: Today's Veterans Read!

2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Veterans Room

Hear U.S. veterans from World War II, Vietnam, the Gulf War, Iraq, and Afghanistan read and talk about their military experiences. This program is a collaboration with the Oak Park Vet Center, 1515 S. Harlem, Forest Park.

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

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World War I and America: A Staged Reading with Kevin Bry, Diana Pingle & Graham Weilgos

3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Veterans Room

Listen to the words of young Ernest Hemingway written to his parents and others from Italy during the early days of World War I. See a staged reading presented by Kevin Bry and Diana Pingle as Dr. and Mrs. Clarence Hemingway. Graham Weilgos will portray young Ernest Hemingway. Local attorney and actor Kevin Bry created the script from The Letters of Ernest Hemingway, Vol. 1, 1907–1922.

With the first publication, in this edition, of all the surviving letters of Ernest Hemingway (1899–1961), readers will for the first time be able to follow the thoughts, ideas, and actions of one of the great literary figures of the 20th century in his own words. Volume 1 encompasses Hemingway's youth, his experience in World War I, and his arrival in Paris. The letters reveal a more complex person than Hemingway's tough guy public persona would suggest: devoted son, affectionate brother, infatuated lover, adoring husband, spirited friend, and disciplined writer.

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

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World War I and America Film: Joyeux Noel (Merry Christmas)

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Veterans Room

Film historian Doug Deuchler screens and discusses films in a six-week series, part of the library's World War I and America program this October and November. Today, see Joyeux Noel, in which an unofficial "Christmas Eve Truce" on the Western Front allows soldiers from opposing sides of the war to gain insights into each other's way of life. 116 minutes.

All films in the series are on Wednesdays, 1:30–4:30 pm, in the Main Library Veterans Room.

  • Oct. 4: All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)
  • Oct. 11: Sergeant York (1941)
  • Oct. 18: Wings (1927)
  • Oct. 25: The Dawn Patrol (1938)
  • Nov. 1: Paths of Glory (1957)
  • Nov. 8: Joyeux Noel (Merry Christmas) (2005)

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

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World War I and America: Author Michael Duffy: From Chicago to Vietnam: A Memoir of War

7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Veterans Room

Meet Vietnam veteran Michael Duffy and hear his story told in his autobiography, From Chicago to Vietnam: A Memoir of War. Both gritty and intimate, his book tells the powerful story of the epic battle the Tet Offensive, from the perspective of this American soldier. Duffy's experience begins when he exits a C-130 cargo plan onto the Tan Son Nhut tarmac—a chaotic scene of blasts, explosions, and small arms fire. Sprinting to a waiting helicopter, Duffy is lifted up and over the city, where he gets a bird's eye view of Saigon under attack.

After his brutal one-year tour in Vietnam, Duffy returns to Chicago before enrolling as a freshman at Colorado College. Like many Vietnam vets,  his return from the war would be met with curiosity, indifference, and at times scorn.

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World War I and America: Oak Park Veterans Day Celebration

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Offsite
Oak Park Arms
Join fellow citizens in commemorating the 100th anniversary of America entering World War I at a public ceremony at the Oak Park Arms Retirement Community, 408 S. Oak Park Avenue. Enjoy short speeches from elected officials and historians, patriotic music, a bugler in uniform, the Oak Park Police Department Color Guard, and more.
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World War I and America: Seeing Is Believing: Reading American World War I Posters 100 Years Later

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
Offsite
Oak Park River Forest History Museum

See the new Seeing Is Believing: Reading American World War I Posters 100 Years Later exhibit at the Oak Park River Forest History Museum, 129 Lake St, Oak Park. Historical Society volunteer and retired history professor Bob Messer provides a tour through the collection of posters on display in the WWI exhibit as artifacts of what has been called "the poster war"; the first mass media campaign in history aimed at mobilizing Americans to participate in the war, both over there and over here. Messer attempts to put these remarkable images art and propaganda in their wartime context as well as encourages visitors to read them from our perspective 100 years after their creation.

NOTE: This event will be held off-site at Oak Park River Forest History Museum, 129 Lake St, Oak Park.

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

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