Oops!
Start Date is not before End Date

Filter Events by



Brown Bag: The Missing File

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Dole Branch
Meeting Room - Dole Branch
The Missing File by D.A. Mishani

Honlon, a suburb of Tel Aviv is a place without murder or any other heinous crimes. However, when 16-year-old Ofer doesn’t return home from school, Israeli Inspector Avraham Avraham must investigate his disappearance. Right away Avraham realizes he must explore all leads that includes the high school teacher who tutored Ofer, to the estranged father of the missing boy, and the anonymous phone calls he keeps receiving. But first, he must separate the truth from the lies.

Brown Bag is a lunchtime mystery lover’s book group. Pack your own lunch and join us to discuss these suspenseful stories. Books are available at Dole Branch one month before the discussion. Learn more about all of our monthly book discussions.
View More

World War I and America Book Discussion: The Summer Before the War

7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Dole Branch
Meeting Room - Dole Branch

It's the summer of 1914, and life in the sleepy village of Rye, England, is about to take an interesting turn as the shadow of the Great War looms ever closer to home. Enjoy a discussion of best-selling author Helen Simonson's historical novel, The Summer Before the War, led by Linda Ivy Miller. This book is full of the same wit, romance, and insight into the manners and morals of small-town British life as the author's beloved Major Pettigrew's Last Stand.

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

View More

Words on Wednesday: A Farewell to Arms

1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Book Discussion Room

Refresh your knowledge of the classic title A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway, a first-person account of American Frederic Henry, serving as a lieutenant in the ambulance corps of the Italian Army during World War I.

In Words on Wednesday, expect stimulating conversation about fiction and nonfiction titles selected by Adult & Teen Services librarians. Copies are available at the Main Library one month before the discussion. Learn more about our monthly book discussions

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

View More

Author Al Gini: The Importance of Being Funny

7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Veterans Room

E. B. White said, “Analyzing humor is like dissecting a frog. Few people are interested and the frog dies of it.” But White hadn’t seen Al Gini’s hilarious, incisive, and informative take on jokes, joke-telling, and the jokers who tell jokes.

For Gini, humor is more than just foolish fun: it serves as a safety valve for dealing with reality that gives us the courage to endure that which we cannot understand or avoid. Not everyone tells jokes. Not everyone gets a joke, even a good one. But, Gini argues, joke-telling can act as both a sword and a shield to defend us from reality. This book is for anyone who enjoys a good laugh, but also wants to know why. The Book Table will have books for sale and signing.

View More

Author Jonathan Eig: Ali: A Life

7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Veterans Room

Jonathan Eig’s Ali: A Life breaks bold new ground, revealing Muhammad Ali in the complexity he deserves, shedding important new light on his politics and his neurological condition. Ali is a story about race, about a brutal sport, and about a fascinating man who shook up the world.

He was the wittiest, the prettiest, the strongest, the bravest, and, of course, the greatest (as he told us over and over again). Muhammad Ali was one of the twentieth century’s greatest radicals and most compelling figures. Ali went from being one of the most despised men in the country to one of the most beloved. But until now, he has never been the subject of a complete, unauthorized biography. Jonathan Eig, hailed by Ken Burns as one of America’s master storytellers, breaks new ground and radically reshapes our understanding of the slippery figure who was Muhammad Ali. Eig had access to all the key people in Ali’s life, including his three surviving wives and his managers. He also had access to thousands of pages of new FBI and Justice Department files, as well dozens of hours of newly discovered audiotaped interviews from the 1960s. The Book Table will have books for sale and signing.

View More

Read & Reflect: The Story of Stuff

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Dole Branch
Meeting Room - Dole Branch

The Story of Stuff by Annie Leonard

As an environmental activist, author Annie Leonard travels the world to investigate how we as consumers dispose of our possessions. She advocates for an international cooperative effort to develop domestic and international policies and laws that will reverse our planet's ecological decline and leave a sustainable world for future generations.

In Read & Reflect, we read and discuss a thoughtful selection of nonfiction titles ripe for meaningful discussion. Books are available at Dole Branch one month before the discussion. Learn more about all of our monthly book discussions.

View More

World War I and America: Essay Discussion, Part 2

1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Book Discussion Room

Join former Marine Corps officer Ed White, who served in Vietnam in 1968-69, to read and discuss a series of essays drawn from World War I and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It. For packets of essays, contact Debby Preiser at dpreiser@oppl.org. U.S. veterans as well as interested readers are encouraged to attend.

This is the first in a series of three discussions, with readings from: 

  • Friday, October 6: From a letter by Alan Seeger to Elsie Simmons Seeger.
  • Friday, October 20: From the diary of Vernon E. Kniptash, written between March and April 1919.
  • Friday, November 3: From Henry Cabot Lodge and his speech on the Senate floor about the League of Nations on August 12, 1919.

Published to mark the centenary of the American entry into the conflict, World War I and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It brings together 128 diverse texts—speeches, messages, letters, diaries, poems, songs, newspaper and magazine articles, excerpts from memoirs and journalistic narratives—written by scores of American participants and observers that illuminate and vivify events from the outbreak of war in 1914 through the Armistice, the Paris Peace Conference, and the League of Nations debate. The writers collected in the volume—soldiers, airmen, nurses, diplomats, statesmen, political activists, journalists—provide unique insight into how Americans perceived the war and how the conflict transformed American life. It is being published by Library of America.

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

View More

The No Shush Salon Presents: John McNally

6:30 PM - 8:45 PM
Maze Branch
Meeting Room - Maze Branch

In his first memoir, The Boy Who Really, Really Wanted to Have Sex: Memoir of a Fat Kid, John McNally gives an honest and often mischievous look at his working-class childhood in Burbank, Illinois. This intimate glimpse into McNally's family takes readers through two states, five grade schools, 210 pounds, and a lifetime of insecurity. Like David Copperfield, McNally hopes to be the hero of his own story, but unlike David Copperfield, he is a fat boy who breaks kids' noses in karate and has fantasies of living in a nudist camp with his kindergarten teacher. From an explosive night in an Illinois trailer park to tumultuous father-son bonding at an endless stream of flea markets, McNally gives the skinny on life as a fat kid. Hilarious and poignant, McNally shows readers that, in the end, remembering one's own bitter past can, in fact, be sweet. While there is no link yet, he will have books to sell at the event!


John McNally is author of three novels, The Book of Ralph, America’s Report Card and After the Workshop, two story collections, Troublemakers and Ghosts of Chicago, and two nonfiction books, Vivid and Continuous: Essays and Exercises for Writing Fiction and The Creative Writer’s Survival Guide: Advice from an Unrepentant Novelist. A native of Burbank,  Illinois,  he divides his time between North Carolina and Louisiana. 


Afterward, we have our open mic: 10 minutes for anyone who wants to present their latest creative endeavor. Treats to share are awesome, but we will provide munchies. Spectators are welcome and appreciated!


The No Shush Salon is a monthly open mic for all creative types who want to share their works in progress or newly finished endeavors. We often begin with a featured performer/reader or we have a theme. No registration required, just drop in and share your talents!

Can't make it? Follow us through our blog: noshushsalon.blogspot.com and like us on Facebook: No Shush Salon 

View More

Author Kathryn Atwood: Women Heroes of World War I

2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Veterans Room

Local author Kathryn Atwood will share stories of incredibly brave women  in her book, Women Heroes of World War I: 16 Remarkable Resisters, Soldiers, Spies, and Medics. A commemoration of brave, yet largely forgotten women who served in the First World War, this book brings to life the often surprising exploits of 16 fascinating women from around the world who served their countries at a time when most of them didn’t even have the right to vote. These suspense-filled stories are told through the use of engaging narrative, dialogue, direct quotes, as well as documents and diary excerpts to lend authenticity and immediacy.

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

View More

World War I and America: Essay Discussion, Part 3

1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Small Meeting Room

Join former Marine Corps officer Ed White, who served in Vietnam in 1968-69, to read and discuss a series of essays drawn from World War I and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It. For packets of essays, contact Debby Preiser at dpreiser@oppl.org. U.S. veterans as well as interested readers are encouraged to attend.

This is the first in a series of three discussions, with readings from: 

  • Friday, October 6: From a letter by Alan Seeger to Elsie Simmons Seeger.
  • Friday, October 20: From the diary of Vernon E. Kniptash, written between March and April 1919.
  • Friday, November 3: From Henry Cabot Lodge and his speech on the Senate floor about the League of Nations on August 12, 1919.

Published to mark the centenary of the American entry into the conflict, World War I and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It brings together 128 diverse texts—speeches, messages, letters, diaries, poems, songs, newspaper and magazine articles, excerpts from memoirs and journalistic narratives—written by scores of American participants and observers that illuminate and vivify events from the outbreak of war in 1914 through the Armistice, the Paris Peace Conference, and the League of Nations debate. The writers collected in the volume—soldiers, airmen, nurses, diplomats, statesmen, political activists, journalists—provide unique insight into how Americans perceived the war and how the conflict transformed American life. It is being published by Library of America.

This event is part of our World War I and America program at the library this October and November. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

View More

Detection by Daylight: The Ides of April

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Maze Branch
Meeting Room - Maze Branch
The Ides of April by Lindsey Davis

Flavia Albia, the adopted daughter of much-loved Marcus Didius Falcois, now 28 and an established female investigator. Her personal history and her British birth enable her to view Roman society and its traditions as a bemused outsider and also as a woman struggling for independence in a man’s world. The story is based on real historical events: mysterious poisonings, in which victims died, often unaware they had been attacked.  Flavia Albia series #1.

Detection by Daylight is devoted to reading and discussing detective mysteries in series and non-series form. Bring your lunch (if you like), enjoy cookies and coffee on us, and engage in great discussions. Titles are available at Maze Branch one month before the discussion. Learn more about all of our monthly book discussions.
View More

New Moms Book Club: Lab Girl at Exit Strategy Brewing Co.

7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Offsite
Lab Girl by Hope Jahren

Acclaimed scientist Hope Jahren has built three laboratories in which she’s studied trees, flowers, seeds, and soil. Her first book is a revelatory treatise on plant life—but it is also so much more. 

Lab Girl is a book about work, love, and the mountains that can be moved when those two things come together. It is told through Jahren’s stories: about her childhood in rural Minnesota with an uncompromising mother and a father who encouraged hours of play in his classroom’s labs; about how she found a sanctuary in science, and learned to perform lab work done “with both the heart and the hands”; and about the inevitable disappointments, but also the triumphs and exhilarating discoveries, of scientific work.
Join our New Moms Book Club!  A wonderful opportunity to meet other new moms in the area and a great reason for some adult discussion!  Welcome to all moms with children under 5.

Copies of the book are available at all locations - Dole, Maze, and Main branches of the library.

This meeting will be held at Exit Strategy Brewing Co. at 7700 Madison St, Forest Park, IL 60130
View More

World War I and America: Author Michael Duffy: From Chicago to Vietnam: A Memoir of War

7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Veterans Room

Meet Vietnam veteran Michael Duffy and hear his story told in his autobiography, From Chicago to Vietnam: A Memoir of War. Both gritty and intimate, his book tells the powerful story of the epic battle the Tet Offensive, from the perspective of this American soldier. Duffy's experience begins when he exits a C-130 cargo plan onto the Tan Son Nhut tarmac—a chaotic scene of blasts, explosions, and small arms fire. Sprinting to a waiting helicopter, Duffy is lifted up and over the city, where he gets a bird's eye view of Saigon under attack.

After his brutal one-year tour in Vietnam, Duffy returns to Chicago before enrolling as a freshman at Colorado College. Like many Vietnam vets,  his return from the war would be met with curiosity, indifference, and at times scorn.

View More

Books & Brews: Crazy Rich Asians

7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Offsite
Oak Park Brewing

Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan

When Rachel Chu agrees to spend the summer in Singapore with her boyfriend, Nicholas Young, she envisions a humble family home and a quiet trip. What she doesn't know is that Nick's family home happens to look like a palace, that she'll ride in more private planes than cars, and that with one of Asia's most eligible bachelors on her arm, Rachel might as well have a target on her back

Crazy Rich Asians is the outrageously funny debut novel about three super-rich, pedigreed Chinese families and the gossip, backbiting, and scheming that occurs when the heir to one of the most massive fortunes in Asia brings home his ABC (American-born Chinese) girlfriend to the wedding of the season.

At Books and Brews expect stimulating conversation about fiction and nonfiction titles in a social atmosphere, and don't worry if you don't have time to finish the book, we're pretty chill! Meet new friends, discuss new books, and enjoy some drinks with us. Copies are available at the Main Library one month before the discussion. Learn more about our monthly book discussions.

NOTE: Books and Brews will meet at Oak Park Brewing Company, 155 S Oak Park Ave., Oak Park, IL 60302.

View More

Words on Wednesday: Killers of the Flower Moon

1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Book Discussion Room
In David Grann's newest nonfiction title, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI, delve into a series of unsolved murders from the 1920s in the Osage Indian Country in Oklahoma. Learn about these murders that many have likely never heard of, and discover what other repercussions came out of them. 

In Words on Wednesday, expect stimulating conversation about fiction and nonfiction titles selected by Adult & Teen Services Librarians. Copies are available at the Main Library one month before the discussion. Learn more about our monthly book discussions
View More

Read & Reflect: American Nations

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Dole Branch
Meeting Room - Dole Branch
American Nations by Colin Woodward

Historian and journalist Colin Woodward explores the cultural and political clashes of the North American countries. He includes Mexico and Canada in his study, but focuses mainly on the United States. As he splits the continent into the various regions, Woodward focuses on colonization, the American Revolution, western migration, the Civil War, and the Reconstruction, and how the red state/blue state conflicts originated.

In Read & Reflect, we read and discuss a thoughtful selection of nonfiction titles ripe for meaningful discussion. Books are available at Dole Branch one month before the discussion. Learn more about all of our monthly book discussions.
View More

Author/Journalist Michelle Carter: From Under the Russian Snow

7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Veterans Room

At age 50, married and the mother of two children in their early 20s, Michelle Carter left her job as managing editor of a suburban daily newspaper in the San Francisco Bay Area in 1995 to move to Russia for a year as a United States Information Agency Journalist-in-Residence.

There she would travel across the 11 time zones of that enormous country, working with newspaper editors who were struggling to adapt to the new concepts of press freedom and a market economy. Carter would become an on-the-scene witness to the second great Russian revolution. From Under the Russian Snow tells her story.

View More

Brown Bag: The Skeleton Road

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Dole Branch
Meeting Room - Dole Branch
The Skeleton Road by Val McDermid

In Edinburgh, a neglected Victorian Gothic building is under construction, when builders find human skeletal remains. Inspector Karen Pirie is called in to work the case. As the investigation progresses, Pirie is surprised to discover that the history of the Balkan wars could play a huge part in discovering the identity of those remains. 

Brown Bag is a lunchtime mystery lover’s book group. Pack your own lunch and join us to discuss these suspenseful stories. Books are available at Dole Branch one month before the discussion. Learn more about all of our monthly book discussions.
View More

Lives They Lived: Born a Crime

7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Maze Branch
Meeting Room - Maze Branch

Trevor Noah is the current host of Comedy Central's The Daily Show; however, one doesn't need to be familiar with his comedy and commentary to enjoy this fascinating and funny memoir. Born during apartheid to a Swiss-German father and black Xhosa mother, neither parent could be seen in public with their son. 

Noah shares stories from his formative years, when he often felt more like an outsider than the shining star he is today. His stories give insight into not only his personal history but the culture and history of South Africa. The subject matter is difficult, with violence, racism, and poverty all being part of his complex narrative. Despite his circumstances, Noah is able to find humor and love even in the worst of times, mostly owing to his strong-willed, independent, and devoutly Christian mother who defied racially restrictive laws to secure an education and a career for herself. Noah credits his mother for preparing him to live a life of freedom long before they knew freedom would exist.

Noah is a talented performer, and because language (he speaks several, including Zulu, Tswana, Afrikaans, and Tsonga) is such an important part of his story, you may want to listen to his words in his own voice in order to truly appreciate his story. 

This is the final discussion in the In The Lives They Lived book group series. We thank participants and our book group leader for the many ideas and perspectives shared as everyone gained insights into the world of extraordinary individuals, and perhaps our own existence and the human condition at large. Learn more about all of the library's monthly book discussions.
View More

Authors Jeff and Val Gee: The Winner's Attitude

2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Veterans Room
Jeff and Val Gee, relatively new residents and authors in Oak Park, have written The Winner's Attitude: Change How You Deal with Difficult People and Get the Best Out of Any Situation. Chapters include  The brain switch -- Overcome your anger -- Understanding how amazing you are and the power you have -- From average to outstanding customer service -- Handling the work load -- Email is information not communication -- Become the observer, not the absorber -- Make stress work for you in your life -- How to really communicate using all your senses -- Accept yourself -- Everything starts with you -- Manifest the amazing you for yourself and your customer.
View More

Author Barb Warner Dean: Women of World War II

7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Main Library
Second Floor - Veterans Room

Join author Barb Warner Dean and learn about her book, Women of World War II: On the Front Lines and the Home Front. During World War II, American women took on many new roles, both in the military and as civilians. Beyond Rosie the Riveter and the Atomic Girls, women made incredible contributions to the war effort. 

One of the civilian avenues was through the American Red Cross Clubmobile program, which was essentially a mobile club, featuring doughnuts, coffee, and good old American girl-next-door friendliness, all served up at the front lines in Europe, Southeast Asia, India, and Australia—wherever the troops were to be found. Learn more about the Clubmobile program and all the ways in which American women helped win the war!
View More

Read & Reflect: The Road to Character

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Dole Branch
Meeting Room - Dole Branch
Has our culture lost sight of the value of humility? This is one of the question that author David Brooks addresses in his book The Road to Character. He challenges us to rebalance the scales between our “résumé virtues” and our “eulogy virtues,” those virtues that exist at the core of our being: kindness, bravery, honesty, and faithfulness.

In Read & Reflect, we read and discuss a thoughtful selection of nonfiction titles ripe for meaningful discussion. Books are available at Dole Branch one month before the discussion.

Learn more about all of our monthly book discussions.
View More

Detection by Daylight: Ordinary Grace

12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Maze Branch
Meeting Room - Maze Branch
Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger

Minnesota, 1961 -- It was a time of innocence and hope for a country with a new, young president. But for 13-year-old Frank Drum it was a summer in which death assumed many forms.  On the surface, this is the story of the murder of a beautiful young woman, a beloved daughter and sister. At heart, it’s the story of what that tragedy does to a boy, his family, and ultimately the fabric of the small town in which he lives.

Detection by Daylight is devoted to reading and discussing detective mysteries in series and non-series form. Bring your lunch (if you like), enjoy cookies and coffee on us, and engage in great discussions.

Titles are available at Maze Branch one month before the discussion. Learn more about all of our monthly book discussions.
View More

New Location! Books and Brews: Lincoln in the Bardo

7:00 PM - 8:03 PM
Offsite
Oak Park Brewing
On February 22, 1862, two days after his death, Willie Lincoln was laid to rest in a marble crypt in a Georgetown cemetery. That very night, shattered by grief, Abraham Lincoln arrives at the cemetery and visits the crypt, alone, to spend time with his son’s body. Set over the course of that one night and populated by ghosts of the recently passed and the long dead, Lincoln in the Bardo is a thrilling exploration of death, grief, the powers of good and evil, a novel - in its form and voice - completely unlike anything you have read before. 

At Books and Brews expect stimulating conversation about fiction and nonfiction titles in a social atmosphere, and don't worry if you don't have time to finish the book, we're pretty chill! Meet new friends, discuss new books, and enjoy some drinks with us. 

Copies are available at the Main Library one month before the discussion. 

Learn more about our monthly book discussions.

NOTE: Books and Brews will meet at Oak Park Brewing Company, 155 S Oak Park Ave, Oak Park, IL 60302
View More

Brown Bag: Gods and Beasts

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Dole Branch
Meeting Room - Dole Branch
In the third installment of the Alex Morrow series, a lone gunman enters a Glasgow post office carrying an AK-47 with robbery in mind. In the midst of the heist, a well-known activist, Brendan Lyons attempts to keep the peace, and assists the gunman by filling bags with cash and then carrying them to the door, when the robber unexpectedly opens fire and kills Lyons. Enters Detective Sergeant Alex Morrow to investigate the crime, but nothing about the incident seems clear. Was Lyons in on the crime? Did he know his killer? Morrow finds herself in a maze of conspiracies and lies and a sinister political network that places the entire city at risk.

Brown Bag is a lunchtime mystery lover’s book group. Pack your own lunch and join us to discuss these suspenseful stories. Books are available at Dole Branch one month before the discussion.

Learn more about all of our monthly book discussions.
View More